Mamar Parshas Ki Seitzei

100 daily Brachas to teach us
not to take our daily existence for granted!

 

Dear Chaveirim!

In this week’s parsha, Ki Seitze, we learn about the din of “motzi shem rah” the man who speaks badly about his wife (chapter 22 posuk 14):

“If a man marries a wife and hates her, and he makes an unjustifiable accusation spreading a bad name against her… The father of the girl and her mother should bring the matter before the elders of the court… And the elders of the court shall take that man and punish him. And they shall fine him one hundred silver shkolim and give them to the father of the girl… and she shall remain with him as a wife; he cannot divorce her all his days”.

The Ramba”m (hilchos naarah besule chapter 3 halacha 3) rules, that this punishment is only relevant when the beis hamikdosh stood and we had the great court of the Sanhedrin. But now that we don’t haveSanhedrin we cannot activate this punishment. So the question is: knowing that the Torah is eternal and timeless, how do we apply this chapter to our daily life so we can learn from it?

Our sages teach us that the holy Torah contains four interpretations that are called parda”s, which is the abbreviation for: P’shat R’emez D’rush S’od. That means that we are able to learn every posuk in the Torah, eather literally the way we read it, but being the fact that the source of the Torah is the wisdom of Hashem, it’s obvious that every word contains unlimited depths. So in our case let’s see how the great “Or Hachayim Hakodosh” zt”l explains the Parsha of “motzi shem rah”; how it applies to all of us in our daily life.

Or Hachayim Hakodosh teaches us that the din of the man, who speaks badly about his wife, is an implication to a person who bad mouths the Torah, which is considered as the spouse of the Jewish people who were Mekadeish the Torah on Mount Sinai. So the Parshe is referring about a man who complains about his spouse the Torah, saying that he learns Torah but she doesn’t bring him any blessings and sufficient Parnosoh.

The posuk tells us that the “father of the girlwho is “Hakodosh boruch hu” – the father of the Torah, will take the matter in his hand, and punish this man who made false accusation against the Torah. But if he wants to do Teshuva to rectify his insult against the Torah, he must compensate the “father of the girl” – “Hakodosh boruch hu” with one hundred silver shkolim, which is an indication for the 100 brachas that we say daily to Hashem.

In this mamar we deal with the question: How does the 100 brachas we say daily compensate for the great sin of bad mouthing the Torah, complaining that it does not bring a blessing to those who are learning it?

We begin with the Shl”o Hakodesh who explains on a Kabalistic level, that these 100 brachas are a key to open the heavenly channels of the 10 “mamoros”, with which the world was created and continues to exist. Each one of these 10 “mamoros” contains all 10 “mamoros”, so they are really 10 times 10 = 100 channels, through which Hashem provides for the world the flow of all the spiritual and physical abundance.

But to understand it on a more practical level we explain, that the 100 brachas force us to focus on gratitude to Hashem for all that he gives us, since most of the brachos are Birchos Hodoah. We start our day with 15 brachos thanking Hashem for giving us back our soul fresh and rested; for giving us back our eye sight, for giving us clothing, etc. In Shemona Esrai, 3 times a day we recite 19 brachos for our spiritual and physical needs and so on through the day.

All this is to get us to focus constantly on the source of all the good that happens to us every minute of the day.  People tend to notice miracles and to be grateful to Hashem when we are sick and get better, or go through a dangerous situation safely. But when our daily life goes smoothly we take it for granted. That is very wrong, every breath we take and every step we make should be an occasion to thank Hashem.

Making 100 brachas helps us remember that everything we have is from Hashem and in the zechus of learning Torah! There for the greatest teshuve and tikun for talking loshon horah on the Torah that it doesn’t provide us with her blessings is to say the daily 100 brachas to Hashem. Because it is then that we realize how much blessings the Torah really gives us.

Chaverim it is so easy to think: Well this doesn’t apply to me because I never complained about the Torah. But let’s be honest, if we would truly believe that the Torah provides us with all the blessings, wouldn’t we spend more time learning Torah morning and nights! So as a means of doing Tshuve in chodesh Elul, let’s present the heiliger bashefer our tate in himel, with a beautiful arrangement of learning Torah and saying the 100 broches with great warmth and gratitude.

Pinches

~ For the full Mamar in Lashon Hakodesh, see the weekly “Hamachne Hachareidi”. ~

Advertisements

Mamar Chodesh Elul

Responding to the request of Hashem:
Please open the doors of your heart to let me in!

This week when stepping in to the month of Elul, we are opening the mamar with the holy request of Hashem to Kneses Yisroel his spouse (Shir Hshirim 5 2): “Pischu li achosi rayusi yonosi tamusi, sheroshi nimlo tol kevutzosy resisey loylo” – Open for me, my sister; my spouse; my dove; my perfect one, because my head is full of dew, my lock curls full of water drops of the night.

We find on this a Moiredike Medresh: Hashem tells us that since the destruction of the Beis hamikdosh, he left the premises of the Beis hamikdosh shel maalo, roaming outside in the darkness of the night in the bitter Golus. To prove that it is so, Hashem says to us: Stretch out your hands and you will see that my head is full of dew, and my lock curls full of water drops of the night.

Before we get in to the depth of the meaning of this wonderful Medresh, we must remember that in Chodesh Elul more than any other time, the voice of Hashem is knocking on the door step of our closed hearts begging us: Please open the doors of your heart to let me in. Please don’t leave me out in the darkness of the Golus nights. Meaning, that we should open our hearts making room for Hashem, by learning Torah and filling it with love to Hashem.

When we hear the voice of Hashem, pleading with us to open the gates of our hearts for him, which human being dares to ignore the appeal of Hashem? Who can take upon himself not to open the doors of his soul to let in Hashem the king of kings! How can we go on with our daily lives knowing that Hashem is standing at our door front?

But of course there is much more depth to the words of Hashem to us: Stretch out your hands and see that my head is full of dew, and my lock curls are full of water drops of the night. This becomes more obvious when we learn in Medresh, that when the time will come for Tchiyas hameisim – to wake the dead and give them life. Hashem will do it by shaking off the dew from his head!

In order to explain this, we explore a wonderful idea from the great Goen Rabbi Yonason Eibshitz zt”l who explains the difference between rain and dew. Rain can only fall down from above after the waters of the seas from below evaporate upwards. After that, they turn into clouds that pour down rain. This symbolizes the flow of wealth that Hashem sends down only after we do good deeds on this world. The effects of these Mitzvos soar up and therefore Hashem sends down a torrent of bounty and goodness to this world.

Dew, on the other hand, comes down in the darkness of the night, so it symbolizes the flow that Hashem sends down in the darkness of the Golus, even if we couldn’t come up with enough positive deeds from below! This is the meaning of the words of Hashem to us: Stretch out your hands and see that my head is full of dew, my lock curls full of water drops of the night. In the darkness of the Golus, the thoughts in the head of Hashem keveyochel are full of dew, how to wake us from above from our deep sleep to do tshuve; to stop wasting our time on meaningless actions.

This actually is the dew of Tchiyas hameisim, because the Gemore says (Broches 18 2): “The wicked even when alive are considered dead people”. So if we respond to the call of Hashem not to waste our precious time on worthless olom haze, then it is like Tchiyas hameisim – becoming alive with good deeds.

So Chaveirim now that we are going into Chodesh Elul, let us all respond to the call of Hashem: “Pischu li achosi rayusi yonosi tamusi, sheroshi nimlo tol kevutzosy resisey loylo” – Open for me, my sister; my spouse; my dove; my perfect one, because my head is full of dew, my lock curls full of water drops of the night.

Let us finish with a Tfile: We should be zoche to the Geule shleimei, so we can experience the miracle of Tchiyas hameisim, when Hashem will give life to the dead, by shaking off the dew from His head, omein!

~ For the full Mamar in Lashon Hakodesh, see the weekly “Hamachne Hachareidi”. ~

Mamar Parshas Eikev

Hashem begs us to put his commandments “upon our heart”
because eventually they will infiltrate “into our heart”!

 

Dear Chaveirim!

In this week’s mamar on Parshas Eikev we discuss a subject relating to the second Parshe of Krias Shma: “ושמתם את דברי אלה על לבבכם” “You shall place these words of Mine upon your heart and upon your soul; you shall bind them for a sign upon your arm, and let them be an ornament between your eyes [Tfilin]… And you shall write them on the doorposts of your house and upon your gates” [Mezuze].

Rashi cites from Sifri that the combination of these commandments with the threat of exile teaches us, that Jews should observe the commandments even in exile, so that when the redemption occurs, they will not have forgotten how to perform them.

The Ramban clarifies this concept. The commandments apply equally everywhere in Diaspora as well as in Eretz Yisruel, but due to the fact that Hashem himself supervises over Eretz Yisruel, there for the kedushe is so great that the mitzvos are done in a much higher quality.

We apply a holy vort from the great rabbi of Kotzk zt”l and the Chidushi Huri”m zt”l, which is a tremendous foundation in Avodas Hashem, who are explaining to us the meaning of the posuk: “והיו הדברים האלה אשר אנכי מצוך היום על לבבך”“And these matters that I command you today shall be upon your heart”. The question is why does the Torah say that they should be “על לבבך”“upon your heart” and not “in your heart”?

They explain: We need to learn Torah and Daven with the entire ecstasy of our heart, but what happens if we are not able to Daven now with the full fervor of our heart? Those that mean that we should god forbid surrender to the Yeitzer hura who will do everything to persuade us: Look who needs such Davenen that is without fire of the heart.

There for Hkb”h warns us: –“And these matters that I command you today shall be upon your heart”. Even if it is only “upon your heart” and not “in your heart”, you should still learn Torah and Daven to Hashem, because after accumulating enough Torah and Mitzvos “upon your heart”, the kedushe will build up so vastly, that it will burn the iron gates of your heart and all the Torah and Mitzvos will infiltrate “in to your heart”.

This we go on to explain is the implication of the Sifri mentiond above: “that Jews should observe the commandments even in exile, so that when the redemption occurs, they will not have forgotten how to perform them”. The Bal Shem Tov says that the heart is equivalent to Yerushalayim. Thus the meaning of exile is a metaphor for a situation, when we cannot feel the true presence of Hashem in our heart while learning Torah and doing Mitzvos. So it is about this situation that the Torah warns us not to let go of Torah and Mitzvos, “so that when the redemption occurs”, meaning when we will gain back your fire in your heart, “they will not have forgotten how to perform them”.

How wonderful does this brilliant idea connect with the continuation of the psukim, who tell us about the two great Mitzvos of Tfilin and Mezuze – you shall bind them for a sign upon your arm and let them be an ornament between your eyes And you shall write them on the doorposts of your house and upon your gates“, because these 2 Mizvos are a open proof how powerful the Mitzvos are, that although the Tfilin are put on our hand against the outside of our heart and on our head against the outside of our brain, they still have the power to transport holiness and Kedushe in our hearts and brain. The same goes for the Mezuze that even it is only put on the outside doorposts of your house; it still has the power to fill the inside of our homes with holiness and Kedushe.

I want to finish off with a thought that I didn’t have enough place to elaborate on it in this mamar. So I will say in short what I learned from Sfurim Hakdoshim: During the 6 days of the week our heart is unfortunately closed being busy providing for our families. Therefore our Avodas Hashem is then “על לבבך” – “upon our heart”. But when then the heilige shabbes comes and we receive the Neshome Yeseiru, The iron gates of our heart open, and all the Torah and Avodas Hashem that we accumulated during the week pour into the depths of our hearts. There for Shabbes kodesh is a wonderful tikun for all the Torah and Avodas Hashem from the week days. So let us all not waste the beautiful present of Shabbes that Hashem gave us.

have a sweet and lechtiken Shabbes

Pinches      

 

~ For the full Mamar in Lashon Hakodesh, see the weekly “Hamachne Hachareidy”. ~